M.A. in Bilingual Journalism

About the Program

This program is offered by the School of Journalism in collaboration with the Center of Latin American Studies, the Department of Mexican American Studies and the Department of Spanish & Portuguese.

Curriculum

The skills-oriented curriculum includes writing, multimedia and on-the-street reporting for print, television and online media serving communities in southern Arizona. Those interested in the professional emphasis program are expected to demonstrate outstanding English and writing skills because of the rigor of the assignments and the expectation that after graduation they may begin working immediately in a news organization. 

The program typically requires four semesters for full-time students. Students also can enroll part-time.

Course Requirements

You must complete a minimum of 33 units to earn a master’s degree in Bilingual Journalism. This includes four required courses, a bilingual internship or multimedia project, and a choice of six electives. Most electives allow you to specialize in your choice of an area of interest. These electives can be selected from Journalism, Latin American Studies, Mexican American Studies or Spanish & Portuguese.

No 400-level credits will be accepted toward graduate degrees. All course work will be based on graduate-level work. Credits earned in the 500-level section of a co-convened course (400/500) will be accepted toward graduate degrees.

Required Courses (15 units)

  • Complete four courses (12 units)
  • Complete either a bilingual internship or multimedia project (3 units)
This course analyzes the history of Latinxs in the United States. Students will also examine the history of Latino-oriented, Spanish-language and bilingual news media, as well as news coverage of Latinos and Spanish-speaking communities in the U.S.
This course introduces the study of migrations, diasporic transnationalism and the media in Latin America. Students will examine historical perspectives and contemporary trends on migration from Latin America to Europe, Asia and North America (South-North) as well as migrations within Latin American (South-South).
This course focuses on the practice of bilingual journalism in Latinx communities. As the first in a series of two skills courses, it emphasizes bilingual multimedia writing and audio production. Working in teams, students will conduct interviews, write audio scripts and produce podcasts or radio pieces in Spanish and English—and Portuguese, when applicable. This class includes lectures, readings and practical experience in the field. To the extent possible, the classroom will function as a newsroom.
This course focuses on the practice of bilingual journalism in Latinx communities. As the second in a series of two skills classes, it emphasizes bilingual multimedia writing and video production. Students will be encouraged to look for new models of producing high-quality journalism. This class includes lectures, readings and practical experience in the field. To the extent possible, the classroom will function as a newsroom.
Students may choose to (1) intern at a Latino-oriented or bilingual news organization in the United States or abroad, supplemented with professional development, analysis of industry trends and best practices, or (2) prepare a bilingual journalistic project that could be a long-form feature story, series of investigative articles, video documentary or multimedia website.

Electives

  • Complete 18 units.
  • Some courses are offered only occasionally.
  • Choose electives in Journalism, Latin American Studies, Mexican American Studies and Spanish & Portuguese.

Recommended Journalism Electives

Internship with a news organization supplemented with professional development, analysis of industry trends and best practices. Graduate-level requirements include a major research paper. Graduate-level requirements include a major research paper.
This course is both an introductory and advanced reporting course for graduate students in the School of Journalism. It is intended for first year graduate students.
This course is designed to give graduate students an intensive hands-on introduction to multimedia reporting. Multimedia reporting is defined as the effective and ethical use of text, still photographs, video clips, audio, graphics and interactivity for the Web.
Students will gain an understanding of best practices and challenges specific to reporting in the borderlands, and will conduct research in and about the border region, including interviews with area residents. They will report findings in the form of essays, oral histories, research projects and in-depth reporting projects. Graduate students are expected to take on a leadership role in the class and from time to time will be assigned to lead class discussions. Graduate students may also be assigned additional readings and duties, such as increased research, writing, and organizing responsibilities.
Work on-site for a news or news-related organization under the supervision of an experience communication professional.
This course will examine the history and development of U.S. press coverage of Latin America. Graduate-level requirements include a longer research paper and leading a class discussion.

Other Journalism Electives

Investigates the interplay between terrorism around the world and media content about terrorism. Focuses on how news media portray terrorism and terrorists, and the effects of terrorism and media portrayal of terrorism on the public. Graduate-level requirements include an extensive research paper on a topic related to media and terrorism. The final product will be a 15 to 20-page paper that will account for 30% of the final grade. (elective, 3 credits)
This course introduces graduate students to the major theories related to the critical study of the media. Fieldwork may include publication of conclusions. Requirements include a major research paper.
Basic legal concepts for media in an international and U.S. context, including access to courts, public records and meetings; subpoenas and shield laws; prior restraint; libel; privacy; source confidentiality; intellectual property; obscenity; and broadcast regulations.
Writing the feature articles for newspapers, magazines or other media; specialized reporting and writing techniques. Graduate-level requirements include additional in-depth assignments.
This class will examine the law of digital communications, including but not limited to freedom of expression and information online, cybersecurity, intellectual property, cooperation/collaboration, libel, privacy, hate speech, FCC and other regulatory mechanisms. This course will teach you how to follow the current law as you engage with digital communications, such as the Internet and mobile devices. While you will learn historical and theoretical foundations of the law of digital communications, you primarily need to concern yourself with making professional, ethical, and legal decisions as a citizen about digital communications, in an international context. From issues ranging from Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street to cyberbullying, we will think about the long-term implications of digital communications law and our decisions. Graduate students will write a research paper on an access issue, minimum 25 pages double-spaced (best papers are 25-40 pages) worthy of conference presentation.
Theory, principles and practice of layout, typography, and design for a variety of media. Graduate-level requirements include critically analyzing a major publication and redesigning it according to newest principles.
Through historical, economic and political exploration of a country or the region, this course will provide students with an understanding of current events in the Middle East and of the challenges journalists face reporting from a region with competing narratives, authoritarian regimes, and sporadic or ongoing conflict. Graduate students are expected to read additional and more complex materials provided by the professor (in the schedule listed as Optional and For Grad Students - some require memos). They will also occasionally meet for additional sessions with the professor. In addition, they will be required to complete an in-depth country report on or a research paper on a specific element relating to international journalism, worth an additional 20% of their total grade. Graduate-level requirements include reading additional and more complex materials provided by the professor (in the schedule listed as Optional and For Grad Students - some require memos). Grad students will also occasionally meet for additional sessions with the professor. In addition, they will be required to complete an in-depth country report on or a research paper on a specific element relating to international journalism, worth an additional 20% of their total grade.
This course will be a hands-on class in which you research and develop an idea for a news website and begin implementing the necessary steps to see your idea become a real website. By the end of the class you should have a website, which you can launch and begin publishing content and start generating revenue. Graduate students will be required to research an emerging trend in journalism entrepreneurship. The student will write an eight-page paper on the subject and present findings to the class and local media outlets.
Analysis of ethical theory and how it relates to journalists' roles and responsibilities in a democratic society. Case studies involve questions of bias, accuracy, privacy and national security. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper examining a major ethical issue and providing a critique regarding how the media covered the issue.
Learn how to find, request and create databases, uncover stories using various software programs, and turn them into compelling visuals. Whether you call it data journalism, computer-assisted reporting, precision journalism, or power reporting, these skills will set you apart from your peers in any line of work. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a topic of their choice related to CAR. Please confer with the course instructor early in the semester to have topic approved. This project will substitute for participation points for graduate students.
Analysis of ethical theory and how it relates to journalists' roles and responsibilities in a democratic society. Case studies involve questions of bias, accuracy, privacy and national security. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper examining a major ethical issue and providing a critique regarding how the media covered the issue.
The course will focus on access to government records and meetings. From the perspective of the journalist acting on behalf of the people in a democracy, it will look at the benefits and harms caused by access to government information. Graduate-level requirements include the research paper being twice as long as the undergrad. It is expected to be of graduate-level quality, and pose a suitable research question that could lead to a later study.
This applied course teaches you to write compelling, substantive stories that illuminate environmental subjects, trends and issues, often in human terms. This course emphasizes the role of the environmental journalist not as an advocate but as a reporter who accurately and fairly reports the news. We examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between environmental journalism and environmental communication. Guest speakers - journalists, researchers and other experts - explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about the environment. Readings and discussions examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, risk, accuracy and ethical codes. Graduate-level requirements include writing an additional story and leading the writing workshops and case study discussion.
This class explores the role and purpose of editorial and opinion writing and the process of writing opinion pieces. Graduate-level requirements include reading additional materials, meeting with professor weekly about theoretical issues or to examine news items in more depth, and a student analysis paper. (elective, 3 credits)
Science is one of the most powerful forces of change in the world. This discussion course introduces students to the professional, legal, economic and ethical factors that affect the science news agenda and the work of science journalists. We'll study the principles of science journalism, the scientific process and the differences between science journalism and science communication. We'll examine reporting methods used by print, television and online news organizations. Guest speakers -- prominent science journalists and scientists -- will explore the ways in which science news both reflects and influences the attitudes of the public and policymakers. Readings, case studies and discussions will look at issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, accuracy and ethical codes for science journalists. Graduate-level requirements include longer response papers and a longer research paper.
Science is one of the most powerful forces of change in the world. This applied course covers the fundamental elements of producing news reports about science events and issues. We'll examine the principles of journalism, the scientific process and the differences between science journalism and science communication. Guest speakers and prominent science journalists and scientists will explore key issues involved in communicating with the public about science. Readings, case studies and discussions will examine issues of balance, scientific uncertainty, accuracy and ethical codes for science journalists. You'll write professional-quality science articles for general interest and specialized news media. You'll learn how to gather, evaluate and organize information in ways that will produce accurate, comprehensive information for the public. Each student will write one short piece, and in pairs you'll research and produce an in-depth article. Graduate-level requirements include writing an additional story proposal, query letter and news report plus the in-depth story or multimedia piece will be longer that at the undergraduate-level.
This is a hands-on advanced multimedia course that will provide students with the opportunity to refine their multimedia storytelling and technical production skills by producing journalistically interesting multimedia projects. The multimedia projects will be well researched and include some combination of text, video, audio, still photographs, graphics that will be presented on a website. Through interactive exercises and assignments, emphasis will be given to improving audio, video, still image capture and editing skills. This course is a combined lecture with outside lab work being required. Intermediate computer technical knowledge and skills, basic photojournalism and multimedia are required for successful completion of this course. Graduate students will be required to produce a well-researched and cited 30- to 45-minute in-class PowerPoint presentation on a documentary film or filmmaker. Acceptable subjects will be listed in the assignment sheet handout.
Drones or sUAVs are increasingly common in many industries including: journalism, engineering, research, agriculture, commerce and more. In this course you will learn about the current requirements for operating a drone for work or profit, how drone controls work, videography techniques and the rules and laws governing safe sUAV flight. This course will prepare you to pass the FAA's Drone License program and legally fly a drone for commercial purposes.
This course will be a hands-on, interactive class in which you research, and develop a mobile news application. You will develop and pitch an application, form teams and implement web technology to launch your application. By the end of the semester, you and your team will have a working application deployed on the internet. This course will take you from idea to application launch. Graduate students will be required to also research an emerging trend in news application design and functionality. The student will write an eight-page paper on the subject and present findings to the class and local media outlets.
The course explores the evolution of U.S. journalism and its intersection with American politics, economics, and culture. Students will read original primary published sources as well as secondary historical works and develop skills in historical research methods. Graduate-level requirements include a research paper suitable for presentation at an academic conference or publication in a scholarly journal in the field.
Students will be exposed to qualitative and quantitative research methods, such as historical and legal research, media analysis, content analysis, in-depth interviewing and discourse analysis.
How international media cover conflicts and other humanitarian crises, focusing on the Arab/Muslim world. Understanding of the business and culture of global news organizations. Graduate-level requirements include more extensive research and papers.

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES ELECTIVES

LAS 500: Introduction to Latin American Studies

LAS 505: Sabores de Mexico: From Farm to Table

LAS 505A: Colony to Nation to the 21st Century: Politics and Culture in Chilean History

LAS 518: Southwest Land and Society

LAS 542: Natural Resources and the Law in the Spanish Borderlands of North America

LAS 545: Democratization in Latin America: Advances and Setbacks

LAS 550: Qualitative Research Methods in Latin America

LAS 560: Film and Feminism in Latin America

LAS 562: Special Topics in Contemporary Latin America

LAS 565Z: History of Central America

LAS 567: Twentieth-Century Latin America

LAS 568: Studies in Latin American Music

LAS 569: Gender and Sexuality in Latin American History

LAS 570: The Feminization of Migration: Global Perspectives

LAS 595A: Latin American Studies

LAS 595C: Contemporary Issues in Latin America

LAS 595D: Latin American Studies Special Topics

 

MEXICAN AMERICAN STUDIES ELECTIVES

MAS 505: Traditional Indian Medicine: Health, Healing and Well Being

MAS 508: The Mexican-American: A Cultural Perspective

MAS 509: Mexican Immigration

MAS 510: Socio-Cultural Determinants of Health

MAS 525: Latino Health Disparities

MAS 530: Latina/o Adolescence

MAS 535: Mexican Traditional Medicine: An Overview of Indigenous Curing Cultures

MAS 565: Critical Race Theories for Policy and Practice

MAS 566: Decolonial Chicana Theory

MAS 570: The Feminization of Migration: Global Perspectives

MAS 575: The Education of Latinas/Latinos

MAS 585: Mexicana/Chicana Women’s History

MAS 587: Chicana Gender Perspectives

MAS 595A: Special Topics in Mexican American Studies

MAS 580A: Advanced Research Methods

 

SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE ELECTIVES

SPAN 501: Introduction to Hispanic Studies

SPAN 565D: History of Spain: Contemporary

SPAN 574: Language in the Mexican American Experience

SPAN 574: Heritage Language Research

SPAN 585: Introduction to Translation Studies

SPAN 696B: Spanish American Literature

SPAN 696D: Hispanic Linguistics

POR 503: Contemporary Luso-Brazilian Literature

POR 530: Brazilian Civilization

POR 540: Portuguese Phonetics and Phonology

POR 552: Introduction to Portuguese Linguistics

POR 597: Advanced intensive Portuguese and Brazilian Culture

POR 696M: Gender, Sexuality and International Migration